• Defeating Deception in Negotiations

    Deception has long had a place at the negotiating table.  Used appropriately, it can be an effective tool for getting what you want.  But how can you be sure it isn’t being used on you?  As with any negotiation, preparation is key.  If you are familiar with the most common types of deception a negotiator might face, you’ll be in a better position to avoid falling into those traps and, even better, flip the situation to your advantage. The Harvard Law School Program on Negotiation blog recently featured an article highlighting the most common types of deception that arise in negotiations, ...

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    Friday, February 19th, 2016

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  • CMM Expands Ronkonkoma Headquarters

    Ronkonkoma, NY, January 2016– Campolo, Middleton & McCormick, LLP, Suffolk County’s premier full service business law firm, is pleased to announce the addition of 4,000 square feet of space to its Ronkonkoma headquarters.  The firm has acquired half of the space on the third floor at 4175 Veterans Memorial Highway, connecting it to the existing fourth floor office by an internal staircase.  The new space features conference rooms, a suite of offices and workstations, as well as a new kitchen for use for special events and by employees.  The existing space on the fourth floor has been reconfigured to encompass additional ...

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    Thursday, January 28th, 2016

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  • January 2016 CMM Firm Newsletter: Things Every Architect Should Know About Copyrights, Estate Plans & More

     

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    Wednesday, January 27th, 2016

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  • New Treasury Efforts to Fight Money Laundering Through New York Real Estate

    To combat the scourge of money laundering from transnational criminal syndicates, the United States Treasury has issued new Geographic Targeting Orders (“GTOs”) to Manhattan and Miami Dade County requiring title insurance companies to reveal beneficial owners of entities purchasing real estate for cash. GTOs are directives with limited duration issued by the Secretary of Treasury through the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FINCEN”) and are authorized under the Bank Secrecy Act (31 USC 5326).  After passage of the Patriot Act, TROs, by definition, last for 180 days. The January 13, 2016 announcement from FINCEN specifies that this GTO will begin March 1, 2016 ...

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    Monday, January 25th, 2016

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  • I Need An Estate Plan – Part One

    Well, it’s a new year and everyone has made their New Year resolutions.  Hopefully one of those resolutions is to do an estate plan.  Unfortunately, historically the percentage of resolutions that are actually carried out is fairly low.  This is a resolution that I hope everyone keeps. Just so I’m clear, I’m talking about a full estate plan, not just a Last Will and Testament.  A basic estate plan typically consists of four documents.  One of those is the Will, but there are others commonly known as Advance Directives.  That is because they have power in advance of death, i.e., while ...

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    Friday, January 22nd, 2016

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  • The GAO Finds That the EPA Violated Propaganda and Lobbying Provisions Through Its Use of Social Media

    By Jack Harrington, Esq. January 22, 2016 Social media’s ubiquitous presence in the lives of many Americans has transformed the way government communicates and interacts with the citizenry.  Nearly every politician, from the President of the United States to mayors of America’s smallest towns, has a Twitter account.  Governments increasingly rely on social media to engage the public, providing information on emergency response and disaster relief to government services and events.  A recent report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office (“GAO”), however, considers when the federal government’s use of social media constitutes impermissible public advocacy in support of an agency’s legislative agenda.  ...

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    Friday, January 22nd, 2016

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  • Things Every Architect Should Know About Copyrights

    Some people say that imitation is the greatest form of flattery.  However, with an architectural work, imitation could result in copyright infringement.  This article briefly outlines some things architects should be aware of in order to protect and enforce their copyright, and avoid copyright disputes. It is well established that both architectural drawings and completed architectural works are entitled to protection under the Copyright Act.  According to the Copyright Act, the definition of an “architectural work” is “the design of a building as embodied in any tangible medium of expression, including a building, architectural plans, or drawings.  The work includes the ...

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    Friday, January 22nd, 2016

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  • Attempt to Have Attorney Disqualified Denied by the Court in Corporate Valuation Case

    What happens when an attorney represents a corporate entity in the formation of that entity and then represents one of the shareholders in a corporate dissolution proceeding?  Should the attorney be disqualified because of the knowledge he/she obtained while forming the corporation?  Will that attorney be considered a necessary witness?  The Commercial Division in Suffolk County recently ruled on these issues deciding that, at least in this instance, the attorney should not be disqualified and would not be a witness. In Altungeyik v. Ayknat, et al. (J. Pines), Plaintiff shareholder commenced a shareholder’s derivative action/dissolution proceeding against the other shareholder of ...

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    Friday, January 22nd, 2016

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  • Successor Liability in Asset Purchases under New York Law

    When buying or selling a business, potential successor liability of the buyer is a primary concern.  Successor Liability means liability that the Buyer of a business’s assets may have for the acts or liabilities of the Seller of those assets. General Rule in New York:  The Buyer of a business’s assets does not assume and is not liable for the Seller’s liabilities unless otherwise expressly stated in the purchase and sale agreement. This is a primary reason that sales and acquisitions of businesses are often structured as asset sales. However, New York law contains four exceptions to that general rule.  The Four Exceptions ...

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    Friday, January 22nd, 2016

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  • CMM Expands Offerings with Addition of Two Attorneys

    Joseph K. Poe is Counsel to CMM. An experienced litigator, Joe represents clients in complex commercial litigation and insurance coverage litigation in state and federal courts. Joe’s commercial litigation practice focuses on the representation of clients in lawsuits alleging breach of contract, tortious interference, and violation of intellectual property rights, as well as shareholder derivative lawsuits and dissolution disputes. His experience includes the successful defense and settlement negotiation in the Ephedra Multi-District Litigation, the defense of a school bus company against an Article 78 proceeding challenging the award of a district contract, and the representation of a technology company in a dispute ...

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    Wednesday, December 23rd, 2015

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Fred Eisenbud